MP3HD the successor to MP3?

Friday, March 20, 2009 8:29
Posted in category Audio, Audiophile

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What do you think of when you hear MP3?  For some, they think of portable music players, online music stores, and NOT CD’s.  For others, they think of crappy low quality over priced junk.  The bittersweet existence of MP3 constantly pulls at the heartstrings of the occupants of planet earth.  On one hand, it makes the .WAV files on CD’s much smaller meaning you can take a boat load with you on your MP3 player.  However, on the other hand, it strips away parts of your music, granted, depending on the quality of the encoder and bit rate the quality of the file will also change.  Still, even a high quality MP3 file is nothing like a full quality .WAV or lossless FLAC file.  Thomson, one of the original creators of the now common place MP3 format announced yesterday a new “next gen” format: MP3 HD.  What is MP3 HD?  Come inside for the sonic rundown.

MP3HD is a backwards compatible, lossless format that will allow you to create MP3HD files out of the original 16-bit 44.1-KHz-encoded stereo .WAV files.  “Lossless” means that none of the original information from the music file is discarded.  According to Thomson, the new format will support bit rates ranging from 500kbps to 900kbps, similar to many formats currently available.  However, MP3HD will have an uphill I believe.  For example, the younger crowd who doesn’t really care about audio quality (myself NOT included), want quantity on their portable devices over quality.  Though, as storage sizes increase this will become a moot issue.  And on the other end of the spectrum, “Audiophiles” already have a deep love for FLAC, OGG and other various lossless audio formats such as WMA Lossless and Apple Lossless.

So both the “lovers and haters” are contempt and happy.  Why switch?  That is a tough question.  What will MP3HD offer that the other formats already don’t offer?  On top of trying to win over rather cold and already formed hearts, what good is a format if no one supports it on their devices.  Device support at launch is a big help for any format looking to break into the mainstream.  I’m sure when MP3HD will have at least one manufacturer supporting them but only time will truly tell.  As of writing, I am not aware of any supporters.  But all is not lost.  Thomson has already gone ahead and got the support bandwagon moving on their own by releasing a Winamp plugin for Windows that will allow you to enjoy the new format.  Now other manufacturers need to add support as well to really get the ball rolling.For more information, Thomson has started two websites on the new format All4MP3.com and MP3HD.com which have a ton of information on this next gen music format that is begging for your attention and love.

So teenie boppers and audiophiles, are you interested in the slightest about MP3HD?  Would you switch and for what reasons?  Let us know below.

Source: Gear Log, PC World

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5 Responses to “MP3HD the successor to MP3?”

  1. Topics about Recycle » MP3HD the successor to MP3? says:

    March 20th, 2009 at 9:40 am

    [...] Gadgetsteria created an interesting post today on MP3HD the successor to MP3?Here’s a short outlineWhat do you think of when you hear MP3?  For some, they think of portable music players, online music stores, and NOT CD’s.  For others, they think of crappy low quality over priced junk.  The bittersweet existance of MP3 constantly pulls at the hearstrings of the occupants of planet earth.  On one hand, it makes the .WAV files on CD’s much smaller meaning you can take a boat load with you on your MP3 player.  However, on the other hand, it strips away parts of your music, granted, depending on [...]

  2. Gadgetsteria » MP3HD the successor to MP3? | MusicalFormats.Com says:

    March 20th, 2009 at 9:15 pm

    [...] View post: Gadgetsteria » MP3HD the successor to MP3? [...]

  3. Bill says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 11:53 am

    No, I don’t intend to switch. Why would I when I can get CD transparency, or very, very near it, with 112 kpbs aacPlus (AAC LC+SBR)? I’ve ripped CD at home using this and really can’t tell the difference when I play the *.m4a’s back on a higher-end PMP using studio grade headphones. I really don’t care if I get an exact copy of the ripped CD. I just want something that sounds faithful to the original source.

  4. Collin Zeng says:

    April 29th, 2009 at 10:11 pm

    Apple Lossless is not called AAC. They are two completely unrelated things.

  5. Mike says:

    April 30th, 2009 at 4:07 am

    I knew this, error on my part. At the time I was writing two different articles, this particular article and another on different bit rates of songs recorded in AAC as well as the history of the format. I got a little confused. Thanks for the catch.

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