Lightscoop aims to make low light shots more natural.

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by Mike
Posted October 25th, 2009 at 10:22 am

When taking pictures in low light conditions, using a flash often casts an unnatural, harsh directional light on the subjects or focal point in the picture. Professional photographers often make use of umbrella like attachments that help diffuse light and give it a more natural glow. But we’re not all photographers with countless attachment bags or the associated deep pockets that it takes to buy such equipment. Thankfully nifty and affordable attachment called the “Lightscoop” may just have you taking professional looking low light shots for a fraction of the price.

There really isn’t anything hi-tech behind the Lightscoop. All you do is attach it to your camera’s hot shoe and enjoy. The ‘Scoop redirects light upwards, bouncing it off the tops of walls and ceilings which ends up giving the immediate surroundings more of a glow instead of spotlight appearance. I don’t have one to try, but the concept seems plausible. If you’re having doubts about the effectiveness, a simple test can be done with a flashlight. Go into a dark room and point the flashlight around at a horizontal angle. Next, shine it at the ceiling and see how the room grows brighter.

Heck, at $35, you might as well give it a try. It’s by far one of the cheapest photography accessories you’ll ever find.

Specialized Lightscoop instructions for a few popular camera brands inside..


Instructions for Lightscoop:

Craziest Gadgets > Gear Diary

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