Archive for: EA

Pure Elegance And Beauty : Behind Enemy Lines

  • September 16, 2011 9:15 am

Everyone at Gadgetsteria Headquarters is extremely excited for the October release of Battlefield 3. The open destructible world, the gorgeous gameplay, the sense of camaraderie with your squad - it’s all there. The fun you have completing missions, slowly busting through doors and silently sniping your foes brains all over the walls, all of these are something Battlefield has owned for quite some time now.

It’s been around 6 years or so since the release of Battlefield 2, and in between EA/Dice partnership gave us some console/pc releases in the way of the Bad Company franchise. With EA finally bringing us an actual true Battlefield game to the consoles along side the pc gamers, it opens up the love people can have for the series. The amazing multiplayer that is actually fun to play. Don’t get me wrong, the Call of Duty series is very fun, but there has always been something different with Battlefield. It feels like Call of Duty leaves you wanting something more.

The screenshots you’ll find within prove that this game is more than just a shooter. It is a work of art. Hop inside to view some amazing shots…

Battlefied 3 Pre-Orders Top 1.25 Million.

  • September 8, 2011 10:49 am

With a little bit over 1 1/2 months until the much anticipated first-person shooter release, pre-orders have already toppled the 1.25 million mark. This number has been said to put it “way ahead” of the previous title - Battlefield: Bad Company 2. Being at the same point we were before the BC 2 release, Battlefield 3 has already ten times more pre-orders.

Bad Company 2 went on to sell more than 5 million copies as of May, 2.3 in the first month. So EA’s newest title is definitely on track to beat that. October 25, 2011 is the date we get experience the newest edition to what could be one of the best shooters of all time. EA’s CFO Eric Brown said this release date, which is 2 1/2 weeks before Activision’s Modern Warfare 3, will be used to their advantage.

Battlefield 3 has already taken the crown as The Game of the Show at Gamescom in Germany. Expect a review of this game upon release. Us here at GS are stoked to get our greasy fingers all over it!

EA Responds: Crysis 2 Steam Removal Wasn’t Us.

  • June 15, 2011 9:36 pm


Earlier today we touched on a story involving the recently released Crysis 2 being removed from Steam. At the time we believed it was an EA decision. However, EA has officially responded to claims they’re at fault and pointed the blame at Crysis developer, Crytek and Steam.

“It’s unfortunate that Steam has removed Crysis 2 from their service. This was not an EA decision or the result of any action by EA. Steam has imposed a set of business terms for developers hoping to sell content on that service – many of which are not imposed by other online game services. Unfortunately, Crytek has an agreement with another download service which violates the new rules from Steam and resulted in its expulsion of Crysis 2 from Steam.

Crysis 2 continues to be available on several other download services including GameStop, Amazon, Origin.com and more.”

So there you have it. Will Crytek and Steam work out the differences? It’s certainly bad news for Steam lovers looking at picking up Crysis 2 in the near future.

[Update] EA Pulling Games From Steam To Promote “Origin” Digital Storefront?

  • June 15, 2011 10:11 am

It never ceases to amaze us just how backwards-thinking company executives and marketing people can really be. Usually when we talk of such complete technological incompetence we’re dealing with the music/movie industry. Today, however, it is EA with news of Crysis 2 being pulled from the highly popular Steam digital storefront in order to promote EA’s own digital storefront, Origin.

On the surface, it may seem like a good idea to remove the competition by permanently restricting the the sale of your games, or at the very least employing an exclusive period. But in the grander scheme of things it’s a disappointing oversight…

Thank you god: Nascar 2011 coming from Activision. Franchise says good-bye to EA.

  • September 26, 2010 2:40 pm

Now I’ll preface this article by saying that back in the day (read: early 2000′s), I loved racing games, especially those produced by Sierra/Papyrus. Back then, the “Nascar Racing” series was a pretty fun series of games in that it was more of a real sim racer instead of your standard arcade style game. And then Sierra/Papyrus went through a purchase or two and eventually closed up shop, after which, EA picked up the rights to Nascar. That was the end of Nascar racing games as we know it. EA moved from a more involved, sim-style game to a more “everyone-can-play” arcade-style. It was ok — for one game. Each subsequent release felt less and less exciting. But there’s hope. Eutechnyx (Test Drive Le Mans, Big Mutha Truckers and SuperCar Challenge) and Activision are now in charge…->

The downfall of EA, used games, and online gameplay: EA to start charging $9.99 for activation codes to “unlock” online, multiplayer gameplay.

  • May 11, 2010 10:13 am

As the war rages on between the pros and cons of physical vs. digital game distribution, no clear winner has yet emerged. There’s a good reason for that — used games. With the control and ability to charge for every little aspect, game publishers are looking at DRM and the digital revolution to revitalize there sagging sales and “stop piracy”. Not to mention, since people already trade used games via file-sharing, any legal variant is essentially hopeless. And of course, greed clouds their decisions unfortunately. And if there’s a chance for corporate tight wads to wring us for more money, believe me, they’ll find it. And find it they did…

Word to EA: Game demos are just that — demos.

  • March 22, 2010 7:40 pm

Alrighty then. We have a new contender for worlds most dumbest idea to turn a quick buck — game demos…with a price attached. EA somehow things taking something that was previously free and adding in a few added things here and there will somehow make gamers interested — interested enough to cough up $10-$15. Mind you, this is a demo they’re trying to charge you for. Demos are free for a reason. They allow us gamers to check a game out before we buy it. Charging for a demo ensures that a lot less people will “take the plunge” without any “preview”. The clever marketing name by EA goes by “Premium Downloadable Content”. Now, being the cynic that I am, every time I see “premium” and other such verbiage, I instantly lose interest. Such boasting of amazingness often results in disappointment and underdeveloped products.

To be fair, if EA actually makes these added premium offerings worthwhile and positions them more as mini-expansion packs, then it has the possibility to do a decent stint. But marketed purely as demos or “early offerings” is a failure from the beginning. No one is going to pay for a demo (that used to be free), especially not $10-$15. In the end, I see people either (1) ignoring the “Premium content” and instead holding out for the real deal or (2) straight up pirating that junk.

You see, EA isn’t giving anyone any reasons why paying an extra $10-$15 for this content is worth it. Sure it’s a solid 3-4 hours of gameplay, but why not wait for the finished product? What about people who do pay for the PDLC? Will there be a discounted “upgrade” where PLDC users can download the rest of the game at reduced cost? Probably not. You’ll pay once for the premium content and again for the same game, with all of that original “premium content” and the rest of the game. The term is double dipping.

EA, here’s a little tip: Don’t charge for a fucking demo! Has all common sense gone out the window…?

Slashdot > Gamasutra

And the consumer nets another sudo win… EA removes SecuROM DRM from Battlefield: Bad Company 2

  • March 16, 2010 8:49 pm

Like DRM? Of course not. No one does. Yet somehow it supposedly makes the world a better place. The last couple of years, especially the last year in particular, game developers have been downright nazi-like in their determination and affinity for this digital cancer that plagues so many digitized services and devices. EA’s SecuROM DRM in particular is a pretty big PITA as it it requires a net connection to “validate” your game each and every time you fire it up. No net connection = no gameplay for you. It’s not quite as bad as Ubisoft’s always-on-don’t-ever-interrupt-me-or-I’ll-cut-you-off DRM. Still, the fact of the matter is, DRM is bad for everyone.

So it’s with great jubilee that I share with you all the good news of the death of SecurROM from Battlefield: BC 2. That disk checking BS has gone the way of the dodos after the latest update/patch which besides killing the cancer, more likely than not tosses in a few bug fixes and other minor housekeeping things to boot. I certainly won’t complain. Anyone else feeling a bit more liberated tonight?

CrunchGear

DRM Needs to die: EA has it’s own taste of server crashiness…

  • March 9, 2010 1:25 pm

Simply put: DRM sucks. It’s bad for consumers and it’s bad for CS at the companies that decide to use it. The only people who are harmed are the very people the companies claim to protect. This time, it wasn’t another Ubisoft snafu (they had their stint over the weekend). Instead, just as Ubisoft begins to rub the weekend hangover junk out of their eyes, EA figures it’s time to have a miniature catastrophe of their own. Yes, EA’s DRM servers crashed too…

One of the more popular and newest games affected by this outage is none other than Bad Company 2. A perfect way to install confidence and entice gamers isn’t it? Joke’s and criticism aside, at least EA was lighter on their feet and got their ducks back up and running in just over an hour or two — leaps and bounds better than Ubisoft’s multi-day outage.

We could nitpick about the various companies’ use of DRM and how they implement it, but it’s all the same. DRM needs to die. The more DRM becomes a factor, the more people will pirate, the more money will be lost (for companies employing DRM), and the more consumers will resent said companies. I certainly know I can sleep at night…

CrunchGear